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Expressions by User

   Displaying page 1 of 1 pages; Items 1 to 2
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^\D?(\d{3})\D?\D?(\d{3})\D?(\d{4})$
Description
This RegEx requires a US phone number WITH area code. It is written to all users to enter whatever delimiters they want or no delimiters at all (i.e. 111-222-3333, or 111.222.3333, or (111) 222-3333, or 1112223333, etc...).
Matches
(111) 222-3333 | 1112223333 | 111-222-3333
Non-Matches
11122223333 | 11112223333 | 11122233333
Author Rating: The rating for this expression. Laurence O'Donnell
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^([\w\d\-\.]+)@{1}(([\w\d\-]{1,67})|([\w\d\-]+\.[\w\d\-]{1,67}))\.(([a-zA-Z\d]{2,4})(\.[a-zA-Z\d]{2})?)$
Description
This pattern allows standard e-mail addresses (e.g. user@domain.com), sub domains (e.g. user@foo.domain.com), the new two- and four-letter domains (e.g. user@domain.tv and user@domain.name) and country codes (e.g. user@foo.com.us). Also, this patter follows the Network Solutions standard length of 67 characters for top-level domains. The reason I allow numbers to be entered in the domain suffix is for future planning. If you do not want numbers to be able to be added as a domain suffix (e.g. user@domain.123), simply delete the last two occurrences of "\d".
Matches
foo@foo.com | foo@foo-foo.com.au | foo@foo.foo.info
Non-Matches
foo@.com | foo@foo..com | foo@me@.com
Author Rating: The rating for this expression. Laurence O'Donnell
   Displaying page 1 of 1 pages; Items 1 to 2

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